Parler will relaunch on Apple’s App Store next week

Photo Illustration by Thiago Prudêncio/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images The embattled social network Parler is slated to reappear on iOS on the week of April 26th, following its re-acceptance into Apple’s App Store earlier today. However, the iOS app will block some content that’s available on the Android and web versions of Parler — a compromise that apparently satisfies Apple’s developer guidelines.
Parler announced the news in a press release. Interim CEO Mark Meckler said the company had “worked to put in place systems that will better detect unlawful speech and allow users to filter content undesirable to them, while maintaining our strict prohibition against content moderation based on viewpoint.”
Apple reversed its ban earlier today Apple reaccepted Parler after a months-long ban under pressure from…
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Twitter, Facebook, and Snap are part of White House vaccination campaign

Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge Facebook, Twitter, and Snap are among the companies that will assist with the Biden administration's promotional campaign for vaccine eligibility, Axios reported. The White House had set a date of May 1st for states to open coronavirus vaccine eligibility to all adults, but later pushed it to April 19th.
The White House is hoping to reach populations who may have higher rates of vaccine hesitancy with the effort. Anthony Fauci, the president’s chief medical adviser, will do video clips on Snapchat, according to Axios, and Facebook and Twitter will send out push alerts to notify users that they’re eligible to receive the vaccine. Vice President Kamala Harris will also be involved with the social media push.
Half of all US adults have r…
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Roblox to introduce content ratings for games to better restrict age-inappropriate content

Photo Illustration by Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images Virtual gaming platform Roblox is developing content ratings for games and easier-to-use parental controls, the company’s chief privacy officer Remy Malan told The Wall Street Journal.
Half of Roblox’s audience of more than 30 million daily users are kids under 13, but the platform has struggled at times to contain sexually explicit content. Age-inappropriate games sometimes surface up on kids’ “recommended for you” lists, according to the WSJ.
The platform’s current system restricts kids to specific games, but under the new system, parents would have more information about what kids might find in a given game; until you play a game, it’s not always clear that it might have explicit or inappropriate content in it.
Malan did not…
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Peloton is fighting a recall request on its treadmill after a child died last month

Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge Peloton is resisting a request from the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to recall its Tread Plus treadmill, which was involved with the death of a child last month, the Washington Post is reporting tonight. At the time of the incident, the CPSC issued a statement that it was investigating.
The agency is reportedly planning on issuing a consumer alert about the Tread Plus and may do so as early as Saturday, according to officials who spoke to the Post. One official added that “this doesn’t happen with other treadmills.” The Post’s sources tell the paper that the CPSC is aware of “‘dozens’ of incidents involving Peloton’s treadmills, some involving pets or exercise balls and many of them resulting in serious injuries.”
Bloomberg…
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Silicon Valley’s Clipper all-in-one transit card finally adds Apple Pay

Silicon Valley might seem like a shining beacon of technological progress to some onlookers, but natives know it can be weirdly hit and miss — like how the San Francisco Bay Area has long had a physical tap-to-pay card that’ll let you onto practically every form of public transit, and yet never let you simply tap your phone or smartwatch to do the same.
Until today — because starting today, the Clipper Card supports Apple Pay, including its Express Mode where you don’t need to wake the device or open an app first.
You can now use almost any recent iPhone or Apple Watch to board BART (which serves the East Bay and San Francisco), Muni (San Francisco’s bus and light rail system), Caltrain (which connects San Francisco to the peninsula and…
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You can finally ‘inquire to buy’ LG’s rollable TV in the United States

Photo by Chris Welch / The Verge We may never see LG’s incredible rollable phone come to market, now its smartphone days are done, but at least the rollable TV we’ve been eagerly tracking for years is finally making it to the United States. You can now “inquire to buy” one at the company’s website, as spotted by HD Guru(via Engadget).
While the company doesn’t list a price, we highly doubt you’ll nab one for the $60,000 originally promised; the motorized TV-in-a-box went on sale in South Korea last October for 100 million won, or over $89,000 in today’s US dollars. We also wouldn’t be surprised if you have to pay for more than just the TV itself, seeing how we reached the voicemail of a “custom integration specialist” when we called the provided number.
While the…
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The next Oculus Quest 2 update brings native wireless PC streaming and a 120Hz mode

Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge Oculus is announcing that wireless PC streaming, a 120Hz refresh rate, and improvements to Infinite Office will be coming to the Oculus Quest 2 with the v28 software update, which the company says will be rolling out soon.
Infinite Office is a feature that Oculus includes as part of Oculus Home, which lets users work in a virtual environment. With the v28 update, Infinite Office will have an experimental feature that allows users to add a virtual desk where their real-life desk is, letting users know where they can sit and put real-life physical objects down without having to leave VR. The Quest 2 will also be able to show a virtual representation of the Logitech K830 keyboard, though Facebook says that support for visualizing more…
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Three reasons why Epic Games can give away $17.5 billion worth of games for free

Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge The Epic Games Store gives away free every games every week — often good ones — and yet the company has never explained how it’s managed to dole out 749 million copies without going bankrupt. Until now. New documents published as part of the legal discovery process for Epic’s major antitrust lawsuit against Apple were published last week, and between those and a series of tweets from Epic CEO Tim Sweeney, we’re getting our best look yet at how the company’s not quite throwing billions of dollars away.
It’s not spending as much as you’d think According to Apple’s “proposed findings of fact” document (credit to Eurogamer for spotting some of this over the weekend), Epic Games is losing cash — hundreds of millions of dollars in “minimum…
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New Trailers: Cruella, The Woman in the Window, Loki, and more

Cruella | Disney So yesterday I watched the first episode of the Netflix documentary This is a Robbery, about the 1990 heist at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston and the accents alone made me homesick.
For those who did not grow up in the land of dropped R’s: two thieves dressed as cops stole 13 works from the museum, valued at a total of $500 million. The art, which included paintings by Rembrandt, Vermeer, Degas, and Manet, has never been found and no arrests have ever been made. The museum is offering a $10 million reward for information leading to the recovery of the stolen works. I’m trying to avoid spoilers because even though I grew up in Boston and I’m familiar with the story, a few headlines about the doc have teased that it…
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China fines Alibaba $2.8 billion after antitrust investigation

Photo by Fang Dongxu/VCG via Getty Images China has hit Alibaba, one of the country’s biggest online retailers, with a record $2.8 billion (18.2 billion yuan) fine, after an investigation found the ecommerce giant violated China’s anti-monopoly law, The New York Times reported. The fine, which represents 4 percent of Alibaba’s 2019 domestic sales, is three times higher than the $975 billion fine China imposed on US chip company Qualcomm back in 2015.
The Chinese government launched an investigation into Alibaba in December to determine whether the company was preventing merchants from selling their products on other platforms. China’s market regulator found that Alibaba’s practices had a negative effect on online retail competition and innovation. Alibaba used data and…
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